Use Hypnosis to Get Back on Track

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Do you have a stubborn problem or a barrier to progress that you’d like to deal with? Then you’ve come to the right place. I’m Robert Plamondon, a clinical hypnotherapist in Corvallis, Oregon. Hypnosis is not only fast, safe, and effective, it’s the most comfortable way of resolving your stubborn issues. Hypnosis lets you use all your hidden resources, from your most childlike and imaginative to your wisest and most mature, to solve your problems.

Hypnosis uses your childlike imagination to bring about change

Ready to get started? Schedule Your First Session Now, using my online calendar.

Hypnosis gets you unstuck

Hypnotherapy cuts to the chase and gets the job done. For example, take someone who wants to stop smoking and has tried nicotine patches, but they don’t help. Clearly, the problem isn’t nicotine, so what is it? I don’t know, but your unconscious mind does! At the end of the day, people do their own problem-solving and their own healing. The hypnotist just helps you into a state where your natural physical and mental abilities are closer to the surface. Once in hypnosis, the hypnotist guides you through a process of more fully realizing things you already knew, and more fully implementing things that, on some level, you already know how to do.

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Fractionation: Try This Sure-Fire Hypnotic Deepener [Video]

Here’s a quick demonstration of the most reliable hypnosis deepener: fractionation. Fractionation relies on a basic hypnotic phenomenon, so with a willing subject, it always works.

What is fractionation? It’s the process of repeatedly taking someone into hypnosis, leaving them there very briefly, and taking them back out again.

The whole process only takes a minute or two, and always gets them into a deep, somnambulistic trance. Watch the video now, and I’ll say a few more things about it below.

It Can Even Be Used for Self-Hypnosis

While it’s normally used to help other people go deeper, you can see in the video that simply by demonstrating fractionation, I fall into a moderate trance myself!

Built-In Testing

One thing I like about fractionation is that it builds in a lot of testing. For example:

  • On the first few rounds, when clients open their eyes, they refocus on you. But as they go deeper, they usually stop doing this and look straight ahead, leaving you in their peripheral vision.
  • As they go deeper, their eyelids become perfectly still while closed. In the video, mine never get to this point, so you know I’m not super deep (one of these days I’ll do a video while in a somnambulistic trance…). Eyelid flutter in light hypnosis is a good sign, but it almost always vanishes as yo go deeper.
  • Then there’s the explicit test. Once they enter somnambulism, the subject stops anticipating your next action, and simply waits for it. So when I break the rhythm of “three, two, … one,” they not only don’t open their eyes early, their eyelids don’t even twitch. So you know you’re there.
  • On that last round, I like to wait at least ten seconds before saying “one,” because it seems to send them even deeper that way.
  • It’s no big deal if you do the test too early and they open their eyes before you say “one.” If you’ve seen any of the other signs, they’re in at least a moderate level of hypnosis, and you can just say, “Sleep! … You’re doing very well,” and smoothly move on to your second-favorite deepener.

Where Did Fractionation Come From?

Fractionation is attributed to German physician Oskar Vogt, who realized around 1903 that subjects tend to go into hypnosis faster and deeper in each successive session, and so he tried bringing them into and out of hypnosis many times, very quickly, to give them a zillion sessions’ worth of practice in just a couple of minutes. It worked!

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How Hypnosis Works: Eye-Lock Induction [Video]

I did a short video on a simple hypnotic induction starting with what’s called an “eye roll” in the biz, and ending with suggestions that your eyes are so relaxed that they’ll refuse to open (which is from the classic Dave Elman induction).

You’ll find this works with a little practice. Just follow along with the video until you have the steps memorized, and you’ll be able to do it on your own for self-hypnosis, or amaze your friends (or perhaps irritate them) by trying it out on them.

Hypnotic inductions are easier than people think, since hypnosis is a natural state we all go into and out of every day, and all an induction needs to do is get you just deep enough that you’ll accept a suggestion to go a little deeper.

What’s Next? Deepening

Once you’ve got that working, the next step is to go deeper, followed ideally by using the power of hypnosis to facilitate a useful change. Which I cover in my post (with video) on the sure-fire fractionation deepener.

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Published in Oregon Counseling Association Newsletter

Flying_carpetAn article of mine, Practical Uses of Magical Thinking, was just published in the Oregon Counseling Association’s Spring 2016 newsletter. Check it out!

I’m not a counselor, but the Oregon Counseling Association casts a wide net, welcoming non-counselor practitioners or anyone else with an interest in the topic.

As a hypnotherapist, I see lots of people who could just as easily see a counselor, but have chosen for one reason or another to give hypnosis a try.

I chose “magical thinking” as a topic because it’s a focus of hypnotherapy but is somewhat skimped in more traditional therapy. With magical thinking, we, in effect, ignore the daunting and distracting difficulties of getting from point A to point B, take a magic carpet ride to B, and spend enough time there that it becomes familiar. If we like what we see, the problem is half-solved already. A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step, and that single step is more likely to happen if you’re clear about your destination. 

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Does Hypnosis Work? The Local Newspaper Finds Out

I was just featured in a local newspaper, The Corvalls Advocate, in “Alternative Health in Corvallis: Six Professional Profiles.”

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Journalist Stevie Beisswanger not only interviewed me, but experienced my services at first hand: she received a full hypnosis session and desribes it in the article. So if you’re wondering what an unbiased source thinks, take a look!

Another of the featured alternative practitioners is Michaela Lonning, “the counselor next door” (literally: her office is right next to mine). Michaela is particularly gifted at working with highly intelligent or highly sensitive folks who have bounced off traditional therapy or couldn’t bring themselves to give it a try.

Four other practitioners are also featured. Sadly, I haven’t met any of them:

  • Chiropractor Jason Young
  • Naturopath and acupuncturist Deborah Nixdorf
  • Acupuncturist Leyna Jensen
  • Yoga instructor Lisa Wells

None of the folks featured in the article are “alternative” in the sense of “never see a physician ever again.” That would be nuts! My clients understand this already. They all see their doctors first for doctor-y things. (Sometimes their doctors send them to me for hypnosis-y things.)

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11 Ways We Distort Our Thinking

distorted-thinking-checklistI stumbled across this list of eleven fallacies and distortions at Surrender Works and couldn’t resist reposting it (with some fairly heavy editing).

This is an interesting checklist because it’s different from the classical list of false arguments, such as a priori conclusions, ad hominem arguments, etc., which many of us encountered in school.

Noticing Your Own Distorted Thinking (aka Cognitive Errors)

Mark Twain defined Man as “the rationalizing animal.” And, boy, are we good at it! Since we’re good at it, our rationalizations usually live up to our reasonably high standards. When we resort to fallacies, it’s a sign that something’s not right. Ideally, we’ll notice this before anyone else does, and take action.

As a hypnotist, I have a lot of respect for the power of the unconscious mind, and when the unconscious mind is pulling in a different direction from the conscious mind, it tends to win. Rationalizations are a sign that the conscious mind has little idea what’s going on, and is making up excuses to fill in the gaps. The lights are on, but nobody’s home. That’s a warning sign.

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