Need a Speaker Who Won’t Put The Audience To Sleep?

Looking for a good speaker in the Corvallis area? Look no further! I give fun, free interactive talks on hypnosis anywhere in the Corvallis area.

Will the audience cluck like a chicken? Why yes: yes, they will. But not because I do a stage show, because I don’t. I just ask the whole audience to do it first thing, to get it out of the way (people don’t need to be hypnotized to cluck like a chicken; just asking will do!).

How do these talks go? I’ll describe a recent one: I spoke at my mom’s retirement community in McMinnville (Hillside) for their annual Health Fair. I asked the audience to cluck like a chicken, just to break the ice, and they were pretty good! Then I had the audience do the “magnetic fingers” suggestibility test, and over half of them succeeded on the first try, as usual. I spoke about hypnosis for a while and answered questions, then walked the audience through a simple relaxation process followed by guided imagery, which included recalling a happy childhood memory that they hadn’t thought about in years.

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New Office!

After two fruitful years at my old office near Starbucks, I’ve moved to a more spacious location at 260 SW Madison Avenue, Suite 104-4, Corvallis OR 97333. This is just a couple of blocks up the street.

Veterans, PTSD, and Hypnosis

Hypnosis was used successfully to treat PTSD in both world warsHypnosis has a long and successful history of helping veterans with PTSD, a history that began long before them term “PTSD” (post-traumatic stress disorder) was coined.

My grandfather served in the U.S. Army in World War I. I don’t know if he returned with a touch of PTSD or not (it was called “shell shock” back then), but since he never talked about the war — and he was a great talker about everything else! — I knew that something about it still troubled him.

In World War II — when PTSD was called “battle fatigue” — hypnosis made some big strides. I have a copy of Dr. John Watkins’ Hypnotherapy of War Neuroses, which lays out his ground-breaking and highly successful work in 1944-1945 helping soldiers and veterans recover, preparing them for civilian lives.

The state of the art has advanced considerably since then, and modern hypnotherapy is better than ever. Sadly, though respectable in medical and mental health circles, hypnotherapy (“hypnosis with all the trimmings”) is unknown territory for most people in the field, in spite of its long history of supporting veterans who returned with PTSD, and other issues.

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Medical Hypnosis and Pain Control

Modern hypnosis was developed by doctors, with a focus on resolving difficult medical issues like chronic pain control, totally eliminating pain during surgery, and the promoting rapid healing. The use of hypnosis for non-medical issues, such as habits and phobias, came later.

James Braid, the nineteenth-century doctor who coined the term “hypnosis,” stated that all the peculiar characteristics of the hypnotic state are things that any experienced doctor has seen many times in patients, and that means that hypnosis is a naturally occurring state. It’s just a matter of evoking it purposefully and setting it to good uses intelligently.

doctors approve of hypnosis

These days, doctors are more pro-hypnosis than ever. They may suggest that you see a hypnotist, or they may wait for you to bring it up, but either way, they’re likely to be all for it.

Many of my clients come to me for assistance with some aspect or other of their medical issues, with the full support of their doctors. These issues include pain control (feeling far more comfortable, often with greatly reduced medication), developing good habits about eating, exercising, and medication, breaking bad habits like smoking or drinking, and finding calmness and serenity instead of the anxiety and hopelessness that could otherwise get in the way of your recovery.

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How Your Pain is Lying to You [Video]

This surprisingly funny video about how pain works tells you everything you need to know about pain except what to do about it, which I’ll get into when you’re done looking at it.

If pain is largely a matter of interpretation by our brains, then one of the most helpful ways of dealing with it is reinterpretation.

Hypnosis can turn pain from 11 down to 1 or 2Hypnosis has been used for pain control for more than 150 years. One of the classic techniques is very similar to an experiment described in the video. In the experiment, you have the subject wear a “pain helmet” that doesn’t actually do anything, and allow him to watch as you turn up a “pain knob” that doesn’t do anything either. And as you turn up the knob, the subject’s pain increases. It really does. Even though the knob isn’t connected to anything at all.

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