How Do You Get More Motivation?

This short video by Richard Bandler talks about the concepts that hypnotists and NLP practitioners use to help people with motivation. People claim that they have no motivation, but if they see a hundred-dollar bill in the street, they move like lightning! So it’s not that you don’t have motivation, it’s that you’re not using it where you want to, and that’s a very different thing.

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Robert Plamondon
Robert Plamondon has written three books, received over 30 U.S. patents, founded several businesses, and is an expert on free-range chickens. Robert's publishing company, Norton Creek Press, is a treasure trove of reprinted classics, including Hypnotherapy of War Neuroses, which covers treating PTSD in veterans. Robert and his wife Karen sell free-range chicken and eggs at the Corvallis farmers' markets. Robert's hypnotherapy office is in downtown Corvallis.

What is NLP, Anyway?

Once upon a time, two guys at UC Santa Cruz asked, “Never mind what therapists say they do, let’s find the very best, see what they actually do, then try it ourselves? If we can get the same results, that’s great. And if we can teach other people to get the same results, we’re done. And it’s 100% practical — no theory, just results.”

These two guys were John Grinder and Richard Bandler, and they studied the most conspicuously successful therapists of the day — gestalt therapist Fritz Perls, family therapist Virginia Satir, and hypnotherapist Milton H. Erickson. Soon they were able to both duplicate some of these therapists’s successes and teach others how to do it. They called the process “modeling” and their new grab bag of techniques neuro-linguistic programming, or NLP.

Why a grab bag? If you test a bunch of things and keep the stuff that works, you end up with a grab bag, not a beautiful theory. In some fields, theories are the gold standard.

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Robert Plamondon on EmailRobert Plamondon on FacebookRobert Plamondon on GoogleRobert Plamondon on PinterestRobert Plamondon on StumbleuponRobert Plamondon on TwitterRobert Plamondon on Youtube
Robert Plamondon
Robert Plamondon has written three books, received over 30 U.S. patents, founded several businesses, and is an expert on free-range chickens. Robert's publishing company, Norton Creek Press, is a treasure trove of reprinted classics, including Hypnotherapy of War Neuroses, which covers treating PTSD in veterans. Robert and his wife Karen sell free-range chicken and eggs at the Corvallis farmers' markets. Robert's hypnotherapy office is in downtown Corvallis.

What Does Hypnosis Feel Like?

Sometimes I get a client who does all sorts of cool and useful things in trance but doesn’t “feel like they’ve been hypnotized.” At which point I ask them, “What does hypnosis feel like?”

In a typical session, I ask the client to relax over and over, and if you’re in hypnosis and I ask you to relax, you’re will! So in that moment hypnosis feels like relaxation. If I take you to a happy childhood memory, hypnosis feels like a happy childhood memory, and likely more — more than just remembering it, less than reliving it.

Sometimes people feel that hypnosis should make them unable to see, hear, move, or remember, but being able to see, hear, move, or remember isn’t called “hypnosis,” it’s called “death”! Not the same thing at all.

Hypnosis can be done without sitting still with your eyes closed, and when it’s done that way you have more indicators. I like doing self-hypnosis while taking walks in the woods. I find that one reliable indication of a good trance is that I get a kind of tunnel vision, where my eyes stay focused straight ahead — no scanning of the surroundings unless something draws my attention. And early in the trance I tend to take an involuntary deep breath, which tells me that I’m getting the ball rolling. If I’m in a good trance I also tend to lose the startle reflex. I’ll notice a loud noise, for example, but it doesn’t make me jump.

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Robert Plamondon on EmailRobert Plamondon on FacebookRobert Plamondon on GoogleRobert Plamondon on PinterestRobert Plamondon on StumbleuponRobert Plamondon on TwitterRobert Plamondon on Youtube
Robert Plamondon
Robert Plamondon has written three books, received over 30 U.S. patents, founded several businesses, and is an expert on free-range chickens. Robert's publishing company, Norton Creek Press, is a treasure trove of reprinted classics, including Hypnotherapy of War Neuroses, which covers treating PTSD in veterans. Robert and his wife Karen sell free-range chicken and eggs at the Corvallis farmers' markets. Robert's hypnotherapy office is in downtown Corvallis.

How do Hypnotic Suggestions Work?

“Look into my eyes. Your fear of spiders is fading away, fading away. You now like spiders.”

That’s what we in the hypnosis biz call direct suggestion. It’s what most people think of when they think of hypnosis. Direct suggestion can be very weak or very powerful, depending on context.

On the whole, telling people to change doesn’t work very well unless you also show them how to change. If you tell someone who has never used a manual transmission, “Just get into this 5-speed car and drive to Miami,” they’re likely to refuse. If you give them a lesson, it’s a lot different. Even if you ask them, hypothetically, how they’d go about learning to drive a stick shift so they can drive to Miami, it might turn out well. As soon as someone has serious thought to overcoming an obstacle, it’s hard to fall back into the previous state of, “I just can’t.” The more vividly you image the process of achieving success, the more energized you are to take the plunge and see it through.

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Robert Plamondon on EmailRobert Plamondon on FacebookRobert Plamondon on GoogleRobert Plamondon on PinterestRobert Plamondon on StumbleuponRobert Plamondon on TwitterRobert Plamondon on Youtube
Robert Plamondon
Robert Plamondon has written three books, received over 30 U.S. patents, founded several businesses, and is an expert on free-range chickens. Robert's publishing company, Norton Creek Press, is a treasure trove of reprinted classics, including Hypnotherapy of War Neuroses, which covers treating PTSD in veterans. Robert and his wife Karen sell free-range chicken and eggs at the Corvallis farmers' markets. Robert's hypnotherapy office is in downtown Corvallis.

How Safe is Hypnosis?

Is hypnosis safe?” Hypnosis is safer than most things. Drugs carry the risk of side effects, surgery carries the risk of complications and infection, while hypnosis doesn’t.

The most common issue with hypnosis is when the hypnotist goes solely for the symptom itself. Sometimes the symptom is just a nuisance and it will go away forever if the unconscious mind is asked to do this in a way it understands. Sometimes the symptom serves a purpose, and removing it can cause trouble.

For example, what happens when a smoker who has forgotten how to relax without lighting up goes to see a bad hypnotist? His real problem is that his unconscious mind has built up a false belief that “relaxation is impossible without smoking.” The smoker likely doesn’t realize this consciously. He needs to replace this belief with something more helpful: that’s the key to solving his problem. But a bad hypnotist will ignore the belief and work only on the smoking itself. In this situation, three outcomes are possible:

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Robert Plamondon on EmailRobert Plamondon on FacebookRobert Plamondon on GoogleRobert Plamondon on PinterestRobert Plamondon on StumbleuponRobert Plamondon on TwitterRobert Plamondon on Youtube
Robert Plamondon
Robert Plamondon has written three books, received over 30 U.S. patents, founded several businesses, and is an expert on free-range chickens. Robert's publishing company, Norton Creek Press, is a treasure trove of reprinted classics, including Hypnotherapy of War Neuroses, which covers treating PTSD in veterans. Robert and his wife Karen sell free-range chicken and eggs at the Corvallis farmers' markets. Robert's hypnotherapy office is in downtown Corvallis.